Monthly Archives: September 2015

Rare and Native Sheep Breeds

BORERAY
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As stated by RBST
The Boreray is a very hardy breed and will do well on sparse grazing and is able to cope with most conditions. Anecdotal evidence suggests a high level of resistance to foot rot and flystrike. The breed is long lived, with ewes often lambing into their teens. The average lambing percentage of lowland flocks is around 140% (meaning each ewe averages 1.4 lambs a year) however in the feral flocks the average is less. The breed experiences very few lambing problems and lambs are small and lively. The breed can shed its fleece although not all animals do so.

Uses
Conservation Grazing
The Boreray’s extreme hardiness makes it a useful breed for some grazing sites where other sheep would struggle. However numbers are very low so this market hasn’t been fully exploited.

Meat
The Boreray has an excellent flavour and in common with most primitive breeds is generally slaughtered as hogget or mutton for a bigger carcass. With such a small population there is little evidence of any crossbreeding programmes using Borerays.

Wool
Staple length- 10-15 cm. Fleece weight- 1.25kg.

A NEW BEGINNING

I HAVE MADE THE BIG JUMP. FROM A COSY NHS JOB TO RUNNING OUR FARM WITH ALAN MY HUSBAND FULL TIME. MY LAST DAY WILL BE MONDAY THE 7TH SEPTEMBER HOWEVER MOST OF MY WORK IS NOW FINISHED. I HAVE BIG IDEAS AND A PLAN IN MY HEAD, THE NEXT FEW DAYS I WILL START TO WRITE A BUSINESS PLAN.

WE BOUGHT THE LAND 10 YEARS AGO AND DREAMED OF LIVING THE GOOD LIFE. ALAN TOOK THE LEAP IN 2011 AND HAS WORKED RELENTLESSLY ON THE FARM. WE HAVE MADE A LOT OF MISTAKES BUT HAVE LEARNT SO MUCH TOO. TEN YEARS ON I WAS STILL A SALARY SLAVE, BUT AFTER THE 7TH NO MORE BOUNDARIES.

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