Monthly Archives: April 2016

Boreray Sheep

Boreray sheep

Boreray Sheep have a close geographical and social link with Soay Sheep but the two breeds are genetically different. Boreray Sheep are the descendants of the domestic sheep which were kept by the St. Kildans. When the inhabitants evacuated Hirta, (the main island of St. Kilda), in 1930, all their domestic stock was evacuated with them. Any stock left on the island was killed. But a replacement flock of domestic sheep had been kept on the island of Boreray. These sheep were left there after the evacuation and have lived feral on the island since 1930. In recent years a small group was taken off the island and the descendants of that small group are now registered with the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.  Boreray sheep are classified as “critically endangered” on the RBST Survival Watch list.

The sheep are a unique breed, being descendants of the now extinct Scottish Tan Face with some infusion of Hebridean Blackface. They are a small short-tailed breed which naturally sheds its fleece under normal breeding conditions. Most animals are a creamy white colour with various black, tan or speckled markings on the face and legs and sometimes also on the body and shoulders. A few dark animals occur.

Taken from Soay and Boreray sheep society

Rare Breeds Pledge

Rare Breeds Pledge
Support the “The Five Freedoms” so you know an animal had a life worth living, and hopefully a good life.
1. Freedom from hunger and thirst: by ready access to water and a diet to maintain health & vigour.
2. Freedom from discomfort: by providing an appropriate environment.
3. Freedom from pain, injury and disease: by prevention or rapid diagnosis & treatment.
4. Freedom to express normal behaviour: by providing sufficient space, proper facilities & appropriate company of the animal’s own kind.
5. Freedom from fear and distress: by ensuring conditions & treatment which avoid mental suffering.

Support RBST.  Taken from http://www.rbst.org.uk/

Lambing Over

Lambing has been very good this year 170%. The Borerays have done exceptionally well. We had a little trouble with crows attacking the new born lambs with the Hebrideans so we moved them to another field all is now well. We had a couple of new born lambs with clicky feet so we orphaned them off after a few days as did not want to chance the fox getting them. With a little TLC they are all fine. Alan is now their surrogate mother they follow him everywhere.

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Our small Boreray flock

Our small Boreray flock

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