Category Archives: soay

Rachael’s Rare Breeds.

Hello it has been along time, I have been so busy but I am now ready to sell my Rare and Native Breed produce straight to the consumer.

 

Next year I will be able to supply Hebridean  , British Saddleback Pork  direct to the consumer/ restaurateur, cutting out the middle man to keep prices low and with the benefit of knowing all meat is locally produced and are cared for under the Five Freedoms on animal husbandry.

 

Please call for further information

 

 

Native Rare Breed Hebridean Meat

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“The meat from Hebridean sheep is unique. It has a rich, dark colour, succulent tender texture, and a gamey, utterly delicious flavour. Tasted against locally produced butcher’s lamb and some very good Welsh lamb, there was no contest: the Hebridean won hands down. It was tender with a really good bite, and rich but didn’t leave that greasy, fatty taste in the mouth. And it was so full of flavour that some of the young tasters couldn’t believe it really was lamb.”
Alex Barker: Guild of Food Writers

Boreray Sheep

Boreray sheep

Boreray Sheep have a close geographical and social link with Soay Sheep but the two breeds are genetically different. Boreray Sheep are the descendants of the domestic sheep which were kept by the St. Kildans. When the inhabitants evacuated Hirta, (the main island of St. Kilda), in 1930, all their domestic stock was evacuated with them. Any stock left on the island was killed. But a replacement flock of domestic sheep had been kept on the island of Boreray. These sheep were left there after the evacuation and have lived feral on the island since 1930. In recent years a small group was taken off the island and the descendants of that small group are now registered with the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.  Boreray sheep are classified as “critically endangered” on the RBST Survival Watch list.

The sheep are a unique breed, being descendants of the now extinct Scottish Tan Face with some infusion of Hebridean Blackface. They are a small short-tailed breed which naturally sheds its fleece under normal breeding conditions. Most animals are a creamy white colour with various black, tan or speckled markings on the face and legs and sometimes also on the body and shoulders. A few dark animals occur.

Taken from Soay and Boreray sheep society